The creation of free trade zones is seen as an exception to the most privileged principle of the World Trade Organization (WTO), since the preferences of the parties to the exclusive granting of a free trade area go beyond their accession obligations. [9] Although GATT Article XXIV authorizes WTO members to establish free trade zones or to conclude interim agreements necessary for their establishment, there are several conditions relating to free trade zones or interim agreements leading to the creation of free trade zones. A free trade agreement (FTA) or treaty is a multinational agreement under international law to create a free trade area between cooperating states. Free trade agreements, a form of trade pacts, set tariffs and tariffs on imports and exports by countries, with the aim of reducing or removing barriers to trade and thereby promoting international trade. [1] These agreements “generally focus on a chapter with preferential tariff treatment,” but they often contain “trade facilitation and regulatory clauses in areas such as investment, intellectual property, public procurement, technical standards, and health and plant health issues.” [2] The trade agreement database provided by the ITC market access map. Given that hundreds of free trade agreements are currently in force and are being negotiated (approximately 800 according to the rules of the intermediary of origin, including non-reciprocal trade agreements), it is important for businesses and policy makers to keep their status in mind. There are a number of free trade agreement custodians available at national, regional or international level. Among the most important are the database on Latin American free trade agreements, established by the Latin American Integration Association (ALADI) [23], the database managed by the Asian Regional Integration Center (ARIC) with information agreements concluded by Asian countries[24] and the portal on free trade negotiations and agreements of the European Union. [25] Why should you take care of it? The United States has negotiated trade agreements with 20 countries to facilitate the cross-border movement of goods, where your customer is located. Access to FREI trade agreements means gaining a competitive advantage. The second way of looking at free trade agreements as public goods is related to the growing trend that they are “deeper”.

The depth of a free trade agreement relates to the additional types of structural policies it covers. While older trade agreements are considered more “flat” because they cover fewer areas (for example. B tariffs and quotas), recent agreements cover a number of other areas, ranging from e-commerce services and data relocation.